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Flooding in England, Heatwaves in Hungary: Global Warming Warnings?

Over the past week, the floods of England have dominated the local and national newsbroadcasts.  In case you don’t know, the rainy season in England (which lasts 300 days a year; not in a row) has flooded the banks of the Thames and other rivers, leaving thousands without drinking water.

Most of the news reports say something about the floods being a part of the greater global warming trend.

 Is extreme weather due to climate change?

With parts of Europe baking in a heatwave, while parts of England are experiencing their worst flooding for 60 years, it is tempting to ascribe this extreme weather to climate change.   But climate scientists are reluctant to make this link.  “You can say that due to the Earth getting warmer there will be on average more extreme events,” said Dr Malcolm Haylock, an expert on climate extremes, “but you can’t attribute any specific event to climate change.”

Some are connecting global warming to the recent heatwaves rocking Greece, Hungary, and Romania. 

Up to 500 people have died in the past week from a heatwave in Hungary, a top health official has said… Some 30 people have also died in the heatwave in neighbouring Romania.

I’m sure that there are not enough celebrities who are talking about this.

2 comments to Flooding in England, Heatwaves in Hungary: Global Warming Warnings?

  • From looking at the news, you would think Great Britain had never flooded before. England is an island that receives tons of rain every year and is frankly prone to flooding. Historic floods happened in 1763, 1767, 1875, 1877, 1891, 1897 and 1946 according to the British Hydrological Society.

    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/geography/cbhe/

    Geologists actually believe that England was created from a megaflood about 180,000 years ago.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2007/jul/18/geography.geology

  • The problem with the climate change argument is that the difference in temperature (less than one degree celsius over 100 years) would not have made a significant affect on weather activity.

    It would be like dropping a bowling ball with a paperclip taped to it on your foot and saying the reason your foot broke was because of the paperclip.

    The world goes through extreme weather even without human intervention. According to the British Hydrological Society’s event page, England has had six catastrophic floods in the past 200 years.

    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/geography/cbhe/

    Again, heatwaves while uncommon to Eastern Europe are not unheard of. In this case, the extreme temperature appear to be due to the jet stream pulling warmer air from Africa up into south-eastern Europe.

    http://www.signs-of-the-times.org/articles/show/137042-Hungary heatwave kills hundreds